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themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
-- to turn the united states of america into a foreign nations for the purpose of dragnet and electronic surveillance in secret. violating the constitution. i could not stand by and be an eye witness to the subversion of our own constitution when i knew it was never necessary. the best of american ingenuity and -- ingenuity could protect the fourth amendment rights of all americans. >> that was thomas drake speaking with me earlier. sebastian, i want to start with you. the argument is the reason this was re-of the rise is that it will make the united states safer - re-authorized is that it will make the united states safer. >> i am is a prize by the negative reaction. it seems a case of the lady -- i am surprised by the negative reaction. it seems to be a case of the lady doth protest so much. people who are so adamant about civil liberties. it is not george bush in the white house and it is not republicans controlling the senate. we have an extended something that was already put in place. if you look at the cases in the past of successful al qaeda attacks in the united states, the need
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both liberal and democratic or constitutional republic and. you can use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. z√úrich government based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution, hence the compound machine. one of the major charges raised against king george the third in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i've read that church. he, george the third has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowl
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we v a series of feisty debates on the hot topics of the day. we start with president obama's nomination of senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. we have a clash you will want to watch. >>> then the relationship between the united states and russia keeps getting worse, whose fault is it? moscow or washington? a debate. also, the next fight in washington will be over the debt ceiling. can president obama end this craziness and bypass congress altogether? we'll talk about the out of the box solutions and whether they would work. >>> and, finally, this is the signature of the man who might be the next treasury secretary. we'll look back through history to see if there's any loopy president. speaking of secretaries of the treasury three former holders of the office and many other statesmen and women offering advice to the president on a new gps special tonight "memo to the president, road map for a second term." tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> first, here's my take. chuck hagel's nomination
of its information, although the united states has had drones over that plant for much of the time. so at this hour this is what we do know, that the algerian government has concluded its operations against the terrorists that the incident is ending. some north african news outlets have claimed that at least 35 captives were killed in the algerian military rescue attacks the "wall street journal" is reporting algerian government sources putting the number of casualties to be ten or perhaps 11. this is what reuters news service is reporting. thirty hostages killed when the algerian forces stormed the plant. two of them japanese, to -- a french national. the nationalities of the rest as well as those who escaped remain unclear at this hour, and those rescued. fox news, however, confirms that at least two americans are among those who escaped and are on their way out of algeria heading to london. still, as many as seven americans are reportedly missing at this hour, as i said, all of this is very fluid, and many of these numbers are going to change as we learn more, hopefully far more dur
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e.m. fields. we cannot continue to ignore this problem. it's that simple. continued in action -- especially since the american enterprise institute has confirmed 100 foreign-born workers with s.t.e.m. degrees create an average of 262 additional jobs for nativeborn workers. let me tell you, these countries would love to have the american educated ph.d's and other highly educated individuals return and boost their economies. not only from their acquired skills, but also by creating these new jobs as well.
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
>> barack obama is projected to be the next president of the united states. >> tonight ofrontline... >> they thought success would breed success. >> we'll move for a quick kill-- that's how they referred to it, "a quick kill on capitol hill." >> their leadership told the members, "no, just say no." >> there was a polarizing quality about barack obama that came roaring forward. >> he was in a position to make demands, and he didn't. >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> i think he understands that the glory days are over and everything's going to be more challenging. >> now he gets another chance to be the guy who united the country. >> in the week before his inauguration, a look back "inside obama's presidency." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.
with the denver office of greenberg trow erring. he was the united states attorney for the district of colorado from 2006 to 2009. he's a former member of the attorney general advisory committee of the narcotics and drug trafficking subcommittee of that committee. he's an adjunct professor at the university. and he is distinguished for public service with the drug enforcement administration, the federal bureau of investigation and the secret service. he's going to help us understand law enforcement options and how to balance this power equation to get it right. michael grava, next to mihm is a professor at george mason university school of law and a visiting scholar at the american enterprise institute. the co-founder and former director for individual rights which is a public interest law firm. perhaps most on point today he is in my view probably the country's single most creative and thinker with a book on that subject called "real federalism: why it matters, how it could happen" and a very important book on the same subject published last year called "the upside down constitution." and fina
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
forces, and by following those roles, military personnel have combated unit -- immunity. you killed during combat, it is not murder. you have a community as a combatant. collateral damage is a corollary of that. if you drop a bomb and it kills the bad guy and some guys around them, as long as you applied the principles of laws of war, then those deaths are collateral damage. the cia has a drone program, and that is a civilian agency with civilian contractors that are not part of the military. the laws of war do not apply. they do not have competitive community. collateral damage does not apply absent combative community. i'm not sure where we get the authority to send civilians around the world to commit what i believe is murder. we finally have the catalyst in which -- the kill list -- when president obama campaign in 2008, he talked about a bush had got rid of our values, but i do not recall that president bush had to kill list determining when an american needs to die without trial. i'm hopeful that these will get reexamined in a second term. president obama met the plane carryin
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
is no other options which is true because congress said you cannot bring them and prosecute them in the united states. so we have created the obstacles that make military commissions. we create our own justifications. it is because of the abusive treatment and detentions and if you peel it back, it's not about what they did to us, it's about what we did to them that makes military commissions seem like an attractive option. and you can't have trained police. i think the public knows that that is the case. every person that was apprehended on the battlefield -- i can't think of any but khalid sheikh mohammed and abu zubaydah were arrested while in pakistan. there were others arrested in dubai and somalia. we have to have this special forum about the battlefield conditions is a great part of this second rate process that is more about less will go what we are bringing to court. another part of the issue is the senate select committee who has completed their report. and also john mccain and dianne feinstein concluded that torture does not work. and it's a stain on our reputation. i think that it'
to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. but america, i have never been more hopeful than i am tonight that we will get there. i promise you, we as a people will get there. god bless you, and may god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: if he had any idea that night how difficult this would be, the next day would prove it. >> so much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around...
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
or the united states or anyone should have called what happened -- [inaudible] but the fact that no one actually dared any questions about the levels of polarization in venezuela, what this meant for respect for the letter, if not certainly the spirit of the constitution, on what this meant for the potential for conflict, um, was i think very sad. and worse, this is a government that is very good -- [audio difficulty] but in terms of consistently named the supreme court violating its own procedures, and it consistently now, and, you know, if it comes to an election, let me venture a guess the constitution requires the election be held within 30 days. if they were wise, they could hold it within five, still within the letter of the constitution, keep the opposition on their heels. i think what's sad is what happened on the decision of the supreme court december 9th and 10th is that there were over four million people whose voices were not heard. we're not talking about, you know, the people that were sworn in only represented roughly about 55% of the people. if chavez is the people, he's only 55%
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >> it is a necessary struggle. we cannot permit northern mali to become a safe haven. people say to me all the
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
five of australia's six states. meanwhile, the united states records its hottest year ever. we will go to australia for report. three men of somali descent are arraigned in new york. president obama continues the controversial practice of rendition, secretly detaining, transporting, and holding prisoners overseas. part two of our exclusive interview with sami al-hajj, the of jazeera journalist imprisoned and tortured at guantanamo for six years. >> when i was in guantanamo, i asked myself maybe it is a good chance for me to be a journalist in guantanamo to be a witness. [indiscernible] >> we speak with the al jazeera journalist at al jazeera headquarters in doha, qatar. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. new figures have confirmed 2012 was the hottest year on record for the continental united states. on tuesday, the national oceanic and atmospheric administration announced an average temperature for 2012 of 55.3 degrees, one degree above the previous record and 3.2 degrees more than the 20th century ave
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
and this fight has moved from northern and west africa to great britain and the united states. the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee called this a growing radical movement and supports the offensive and he is outfront tonight. thank you for taking the time. i appreciate it. the islamist military commander who we spoke to said they demand an end to the war to release the hostages. we are hearing this attack has been in the works before the french formalal involvement. should the united states be negotiating with these al qaeda linked groups? >> here is the difficulty and you have done great reporting on this. for the last six years this particular al qaeda affiliate has been taking westerners hostages and have been using this for bargaining power. they then use the monetary ransom in order to build their organization. they are also freshly supplied from some of the weapons that they picked up in libya. so we have a situation, frankly, where i think we have to hope that the french foreign legion forces and other forces engage and make very quick progress. i say that because once
calls for creating a path to citizenship for those who are already living here in the united states illegally and they also want to reform the legal immigration system that the u.s. has in place and they want to create an effective employment verification system to prevent the hiring of unauthorized workers which will help combat identity theft and establishing an improved process for future workers it to serve our work force needs. tomorrow, president obama is expect today layout his vision for sweeping immigration reforms and billed as a major speech, however, ahead of that and in response to what we heard today out of the senate i thought i would share my views, as a conservative on this topic. now, the issue of immigration has been used as a political wedge by democrats for years. and now, republicans, they have been falsely accused of not caring about latino immigrants because the republicans demand that our borders be secured and secured first. now, let's cut to the chase, if we don't secure american borders, we'll never be safe as a country. this has got to be a top national
of the united states. >> the political theater and dignified simplicity, designed to show off a new nation's representativive government. today is special because it's sunday. tomorrow is the ceremonial swearing in on the mall. >> in this day and age, inaugurations have their own set of challenges. we will go over over the logistics and the schedule and the security. >> the formal swearing in is today. today is january 20, the constitutionally mandated day the president must be sworn in. that takes place in about an hour at the white house. we will get a preview from ed henry. >> good morning. interesting, the crowd's a lot smaller than they were four years ago. but still, as you noted, a lot of pomp and circumstance. it started when the president went to arlington national cemetery, met up with vice-president biden. there was a laying of a wreath at the tomb of the unknowns. the vice-president had been sworn in already this morning, a little bit earlier than the president. that's in part because he was sworn in by justice sotomayor who has a book signing this afternoon in new york city. t
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. wasunited states of america 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the port -- of the puzzle is to elect pro- choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with our approach was anyway. -- our pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of t
to really take the lead against the terrorists in northern mali. . this is hard. if the united states comes in and does something on her own, nobody can match us in military assets and prowess, but a lot of the challenges we face are not immediately or sustainbly solved by military action alone, therefore, we have to get countries in the region to increase their border security and increase their counterterrorist efforts inside their own boards. we have a lot to do now in west africa. so i think you're right to point out, the united states has to play a role, but it needs to be part of a multi lateral effort in order to have a chance at success. >> thank you, madam secretary. we have discussed many important issues. i remain concerned about whether the accountability review board captured the full picture of what happened, but i think we can agree to work together moving ahead to improve security in a number of different areas. this hearing now stands adjourned. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> secretary of s
held as the toughest gun control law in the united states and the first since the massacre in newtown. assembly members are expected to vote on the legislative package today after it has the new york senate late monday. the proposal would expand new york's ban on assault weapons and authorize law enforcement to confiscate guns from mental health patients if a professional reports -- if a professional reports they're likely to hurt themselves or others. on monday, a group of parents of newtown victims and surviving students unveiled a new initiative to tackle gun violence and mental illness in the u.s. two grieving parents as well as the group's co-founder described the sandy hook promise as an effort to spark a national conversation on how to prevent future tragedies. >> i do not want to be someone sharing my experience and consoling another parent next time. i do not want there to be a next time. the sandy hook promise is the start of our change. >> we need to face and take action on hard issues. there is not going to be one simple solution. but we feel is essential to get a deeper u
and the united states. today, he called the terrorist attack in algeria, the latest and growing demonstration of a radical movement across west africa. he supports the movement. he is out front tonight. thank you very much for taking the time. i appreciate it. the islamist commander we spoke to whom you just heard there said, they demand a release of the war. this attack had been in the works before the french involvement in mali. former military involvement. the question is, should the united states be negotiating with these al qaeda linked groups? >> here is the difficulty. you have done some great reporting on this. as you know, for the last six years, this particular all qaeda affiliate has been taking westerners as hostages, many of them french. they are using this for bargaining power and collecting ransom and then they use the monetary ransom to build their organization. they are freshly supplied from some of the weapons they picked up in libya. so we have a situation frankly where i think we've got to hope that the french foreign legion forces an other french forces engaged make very
is that the united states government now spends more on immigration enforcement than on all other principal law enforcement agencies combined. we are spending as of fiscal year 2011, which is the most recent year for the data that we're using that was available, that's the price tag of $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 2
on tackling gun violence in the united states. in a welcome message to his guests, biden vowed president obama would take meaningful action through executive order if need be. >> we are here today to deal with the problem that requires immediate action, urgent action. the president and i are determined to take action. this is not an exercise in a photo opportunity just ask you what your opinions are. we're reaching out to all parties on whatever side of this debate you fall. but the president is going to t. there are executive orders, executive action that can be taken. we have not decided what that is yet, that we are compiling it with the help of the attorney general and the rest of the cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is required. >> vice president said to me today with representatives of the national rifle association as well as gun retailers, including walmart. new york governor andrew cuomo has unveiled what he's billed as the toughest gun control legislation in the country in the aftermath of last month's newtown massacre in neighboring connecticut. in an impassi
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